Cayenne has been known to bring blood and body heat to the surface, stimulating sweating and cooling of the body. It also acts as an energy stimulant, slightly encouraging the adrenals to produce cortisone (Keville, 1996). Research has shown that Capsaicin blocks the transmission of pain and itching by nerve fibers in the skin. When Capsaicin applied in the form of a tropical cream helps to relieve pain by depleting local supplies of a neurotransmitter called substance P. (Hoffman 1996). Clinical trials showed that 75% of the people who applied a capsaicin cream on their shingle disease experienced substantial pain relief, with only occasional burning sensation. A small amount of cayenne stabilizes blood pressure and reduces excessive bleeding anywhere in the body. Scientific literature review also shown that ulcer patients in a New Delhi, India Hospital experienced the same rate of healing after 4 weeks of eating 3 grams (1/2 teaspoon) a day as those who abstained (Keville, 1996).

 

Ca...

Every year the International Herb Association (http://www.iherb.org/117-2/) celebrates the herb.  The purpose of the herb of the year is to develop and coordinate national attention on herbs, herbal uses, herb businesses, and the IHA.  This year's herb is the very popular Capsicum annuum pepper plant.  You maybe familiar of Capsicum annuum plant in hot sauce if you from the South or in Pepper Spray if you are in Law Enforcement.  The interesting thing about this herb is its powerful ingredients and its verstility particularly in cooking.  

 

Capsicum annuum otherwise known as the Cayenne plant has a very rich history since the time of Columbus coming to the new world.  Capsicum annuum (Cayenne) plant was first introduced to Europe with the return of Christopher Columbus from the New World. The cayenne pepper plant is a hot biting taste of a fruit and has been cultivated for hundreds, even thousands of years in the tropical regions of the world such as t...

 

February is the American Heart Association “Go Wear Red” campaign where the organization raises heart disease awareness for women.  A lot of us ladies will be wearing out lovely red suits and red dress pins but do we really know how it is important to prevent and fight against this deadly disease.

 

It is estimated that 43 million women in the U.S. are affected by heart disease unfortunately only one in five women believe heart disease is a great health problem.  Is it due to the lack of  education about heart disease or is it still being known as a Man’s Disease?

 

Unfortunately, African American women are at greater risk of cardiovascular disease and nearly half (49 percent) of all non-Hispanic African-American females have some form of heart disease, stroke or other CVD.  

 

American Heart Association states that estimates that the Go Red for Women campaign has already raised awareness and saved more than 627,000 lives since its inception but there is still a grim statistical side o...

A person once told me that there is no way you can have a healthy heart valentine’s day. When you are out with the one you love you can’t but splurge on chocolate rich assortments of candies, you usually skip your exercise plan to get ready for the valentine’s day evening date and eating out at a fine highly fat tasting restaurant where you top of the meal with a luscious unhealthy dessert.  The person continued to say that the only healthy thing during that day are the roses!

 

I had to agree and disagree this statement that this person told me.  The part I do agree with is yes that it can be a unhealthy eating day but I also disagree that it has to be like this on Valentine’s Day.  We all have a choice on how we are going to eat and how we are going to spend time together on this day but we can make a choice in doing this in a heart healthy way.

 

First, we can decide on what types chocolates candies that can be given as a gift.  There has been research that dark chocolate candy tha...

Since the winter  is here do you think eating locally needs to stop during this time of year? Definitely not so! Cold weather crops, the use of hoop houses and other methods to extend the natural growing season, and old storage bins for vegetables like cabbages and potatoes all mean that there are plenty of winter fruits and vegetables to choose from in most of the country. Look for the winter fruits and vegetables at farmers markets and in produce departments for the best flavor (and greatest value) in season. Specific crops and harvest dates will depend on your region’s climate and most of these are only available locally in temperate regions.

 

What types of fruits and vegetables are good to eat during the winter season?  They are cabbage, celery, pears, carrots, spinach, brussels sprouts, parsnips, cauliflower, broccoli, grapefruit, sweet potatoes and yams, onions and leeks, potatoes, winter squash, mushrooms, pears and turnips.

 

If you want to extend your winter gardening season then...

Please reload

Archive
Follow Me
RSS Feed
  • LinkedIn Social Icon
  • Facebook Social Icon
  • Twitter Social Icon
  • Google+ Social Icon
  • YouTube Social  Icon
  • Pinterest Social Icon
  • Instagram Social Icon

Follow Me

Welcome to the Living Healthy Blog! 

Hello!

I am Denine Rogers, MS, RDN, LD, FAND a integrative dietitian nutritionist and wellness coach. So excited that you are viewing my blog!

I am on a quest in learning how to live healthy in the areas of Integrative Medicine, Herbal Medicine, Aromatherapy  and Nutrition.

 

 Living Healthy is a blog for the nutrition and wellness consulting business called

Living Healthy  www.livinghealthy1.org .  

 

So Enjoy

and

Start Living Healthy Today!

Read More About Me 

 

"The food you eat can be either the safest and most powerful form of medicine or the slowest form of poison." -Ann Wigmore

When you subscribe, you will receive 5 Free Secrets Healthy Foods Tips to Jump Start Your 2017 Living Healthy Solutions!

This blog is meant to inform and entertain the general public and other healthcare providers on nutrition and health issues. Information on this blog does not replace that of your own health care provider. The opinions presented on this blog are my own and do not necessarily represent that of my employer or associations.  This blog is designed for educational and entertainment purposes only. You should not rely on this information as a substitute for personal medical attention, diagnosis or hands-on treatment. None of the information in these posts are to be mistaken for medical care or recommendations. ALWAYS consult your doctor prior to changing your diet or starting a new supplement or exercise regime. The information in this blog is based in either opinion, life experience, or sometimes hard science. As I am simply sharing what I feel to be the truth in my life, I always urge people to find what they consider to be theirs. Thanks for reading and enjoy!

Archives

Please reload

Featured Posts

This is the Season for the Atlanta Community Food Bank

December 25, 2017

1/10
Please reload

    Tel:  678-741-5338

    Living Healthy

    3400 Chapel Hill Road

    Suite 100-17

    Douglasville, GA 30135

    customerservice@livinghealthy1.org

    • LinkedIn Social Icon
    • Facebook Social Icon
    • Twitter Social Icon
    • Pinterest Social Icon
    • Google+ Social Icon
    • YouTube Social  Icon
    • Instagram Social Icon

    © 2015 by Denine Rogers. Proudly created with Wix.com.  All Rights Reserved.