Natural Support of Diet for Persons Living with AIDS

 

   

      On Friday, December 1st, 2017 is World AIDS Day.  AIDS (Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome)  is an immune system disorder in which the body's ability itself is greatly diminished (Sizer & Whitney 1997).   People with AIDS frequently experience severe PEM ( Protein-Energy Malnutrition) and wasting which often begins early in the disease and becomes progressively worse (Sizer & Whitney 1997).   AIDS clients early signs of deterioration are weight loss, reduced body fat, and low body mass index.  Preventing and treating malnutrition and wasting should be a high priority in the care of AIDS-infected people.  Adequate nutrition can help maintain body tissues and improve life's quality for AIDS client.  Frequently AIDS clients suffer anorexia and may refuse food.  They also may more readily accept small, frequent snacks than large meals (Sizer & Whitney 1997).  


    Some of the foods that should be included in the diet plan are to increase your intake of fresh fruits and vegetables.  Eat a diet consisting of 75 percent  raw foods, organically grown if possible plus lentils, beans, seeds, nuts, and whole grains, including brown rice and millet. They provide energy-boosting B vitamins and plant-based protein that helps preserve skeletal muscle mass and promote the repair and growth of new muscle tissue. (Wilson 2014). Also non-acid-forming fruit such as bananas, all berries, peaches, apples, and melons. Having these types of fruits represent phytochemicals and antioxidants that may strengthen the body's ability to defend itself against infections and other chronic illnesses (Wilson 2014).  Raw foods are particularly important because cooking depletes foods and their enzymes (Balch 2006).  Eat plenty of cruciferous vegetables, such as broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbage and cauliflower.  Also consume yellow and deep-orange vegetables such as carrot, pumpkin, squash and yams (Balch 2006). Eating these vegetables would support a strong immune system (Wilson 2014).  Consume plenty of fresh live juices due to the beneficial supply of nutrients.  Green drinks made from leafy greens such as kale, spinach and beet greens, carrots and beet root juice should be consumed on a daily basis with garlic and onion added  (Balch 2006).  


    Limit the intake of soybeans and soy products which contains enzyme inhibitors. Do eliminate diet colas, foods with additives and colorings, junk foods, peanuts, processed refined foods, saturated fats, salt, sugar and sugar products, white flour, all animal protein, and anything containing caffeine (Balch 2006).  Protein is part of the body's defense mechanism. Eat a variety of protein foods, including seafood, lean meat, poultry, eggs, beans and peas, soy products and unsalted nuts and seeds (Wilson 2014).  Foods with anti-inflammatory properties including omega-3 fatty acids found in salmon, tuna, mackerel and walnuts are excellent additions to a healthy diet (Wilson 2014).  Drink more than eight cups of fluid, particularly water, per day. It is also good to take fluid in other forms to replace the salts that have been lost and provide energy (Tontisirin & Clugston 2006).   

    

For the last week of Diabetes Awareness Month, I was quoted in this article -  Should You Use Essential Oils for Diabetes Treatment? below.   Click this link:   https://www.everydayhealth.com/type-2-diabetes/treatment/what-are-best-essential-oils-diabetes/

 

 
References 


Balch, P. (2006). AIDS (Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome)  In Prescription for Nutritional Healing (4th ed., pp. 166-170). New York, New York: Penguin Group.  


Sizer, F. & Whitney, E. (1997). Nutrition and Disease Prevention.  Nutrition: Concepts and Controversies (7th ed., pp. 427-428). Belmont, California: Wadsworth Publishing Company.


Tontisirin, K & Clugston, G (2006).  Living well with HIV/AIDS:  A manual on nutritional care and support for people living with HIV/AIDS.  Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations and World Health Organization. (pp 19-25) Rome, Italy  


Wilson, C. (December 01, 2014). Eating Well With HIV.  Eat Right: Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. http://www.eatright.org/resource/health/diseases-and-conditions/hiv-aids/eating-well-with-hiv 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Please reload

Featured Posts

This is the Season for the Atlanta Community Food Bank

December 25, 2017

1/10
Please reload

Archives
Please reload

Tel:  678-741-5338

Living Healthy

3400 Chapel Hill Road

Suite 100-17

Douglasville, GA 30135

customerservice@livinghealthy1.org

  • LinkedIn Social Icon
  • Facebook Social Icon
  • Twitter Social Icon
  • Pinterest Social Icon
  • Google+ Social Icon
  • YouTube Social  Icon
  • Instagram Social Icon

© 2015 by Denine Rogers. Proudly created with Wix.com.  All Rights Reserved.

 

  • LinkedIn Social Icon
  • Facebook Social Icon
  • Twitter Social Icon
  • Google+ Social Icon
  • YouTube Social  Icon
  • Pinterest Social Icon
  • Instagram Social Icon

Follow Me

Welcome to the Living Healthy Blog! 

Hello!

I am Denine Rogers, MS, RDN, LD, FAND a integrative dietitian nutritionist and wellness coach. So excited that you are viewing my blog!

I am on a quest in learning how to live healthy in the areas of Integrative Medicine, Herbal Medicine, Aromatherapy  and Nutrition.

 

 Living Healthy is a blog for the nutrition and wellness consulting business called

Living Healthy  www.livinghealthy1.org .  

 

So Enjoy

and

Start Living Healthy Today!

Read More About Me